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Panchatantra
           

   


Complete & Unabridged Translation

28. POOR BLOSSOM
 

 
   

 

           
         

 
   

God Indra once had a parrot named Blossom. He enjoyed supreme beauty, loveliness, and various graces, while his intelligence was not blunted by his extensive scientific attainments.  

 
Blossom
Credit: Chi Liu, Flickr

           
         

 
   

One day he was resting on the palm of great Indra's hand, his body thrilling with delight at that contact, and was reciting a variety of authoritative formulas, when he caught sight of Yama, lord of death, who had come to pay his respects at the time appointed. Seeing the god, the parrot edged away. And all the thronging immortals asked him: "Why did you move away, sir, upon beholding that personage?" "But," said the parrot, "he brings harm to all living creatures. Why not move away from him?"  

 

           
         

 
   

Upon hearing this, they all desired to calm his fears, so said to Yama: "As a favor to us, you must please not kill this parrot." And Yama replied: "I do not know about that. It is Time who determines these matters."

They therefore took Blossom with them, paid a visit to Time, and made the same request. To which Time replied: "It is Death who is posted in these affairs. Pray speak to him."
 

 

           
         

 
   

But when they did so, the parrot died at the mere sight of Death. And they were all distressed at seeing the occurrence, so that they said to Yama: "What does this mean?" And Yama said: "It was simply fated that he should die at the mere sight of Death." With this reply they went back to heaven.

 
"And that is why I say:
     All fated happenings, ....


and the rest of it.

["All fated happenings, derived
From any former state,
Must changeless stand: the very gods
Endured poor Blossom's fate."]

 
 

           
         

 
   

[Assignments on this story are given at bottom of this webpage. You may jump to them!]

 
 

           
         

 
   

[STORY OF 'THE GIRL WHO MARRIED A SNAKE' CONTINUES ... ]

 
 

           
         

 
   

Furthermore, I do not wish my father reproached for double dealing on the part of his daughter." When she had said this, she married the snake, with the permission of her companions, and at once began devoted attendance upon him by offering milk to drink and performing other services.  

 
When she had said this, she married the snake.
Credit: Lololon.jugem.jp (A Japanese Website)

           
         

 
   

One night the serpent issued from the generous chest which had been set for him in her chamber, and entered her bed. "Who is this?" she cried. "He has the form of a man." And thinking him a strange man, she started up, trembling in every limb, unlocked the door, and was about to dart away when she heard him say: "Stay, my dear wife. I am your husband." Then, in order to convince her, he re-entered the body which he had left behind in the chest, issued from it again, and came to her.

When she beheld him flashing with lofty crown, with earrings, bracelets, armbands, and rings, she fell at his feet, and then they sank into a glad embrace.
 

 

Credit: Lololon.jugem.jp (A Japanese Website)

           
         

 
   

Now his father, the Brahman, rose early and discovered how matters stood. He therefore seized the serpent's skin that lay in the chest, and consumed it with fire, for he thought: "I do not want him to enter that again." And in the morning he and his wife, with the greatest possible joy, introduced to everybody as their own an extraordinarily handsome son, quite wrapped up in his love affair.  

 

Credit: Lololon.jugem.jp (A Japanese Website)

           
         

 
   

[STORY OF 'THE MONK WHO LEFT HIS BODY BEHIND' CONTINUES ... ]

 
 

           
         

 
   

 After Strong had related this parallel case to the king, he set fire to the cell that contained the naked monk.

 "And that is why I say:
The counselor whose name was Strong, ....

and the rest of it.

["The counselor whose name was Strong
Attained his dearest heart's desire:
He won the favor of his king;
He burned the naked monk with fire."]

 
 

           
         

 
   

[FRAME STORY OF 'THE LION, BULL, AND JACKALS' CONTINUES ...(Scene 17/22) ]

 
 


           
         

 
   

Poor fool! Such men are true counselors, not creatures like you, who make a living by a mere pretense of administrative competence, though quite ignorant of the ways of statecraft. Your evil conduct demonstrates an inherited lack of executive capacity. Surely, your father before you was the same kind of person. For

The character of sons
The father e'er reflects:
Who, from a screw-pine tree,
An emblic fruit expects?
 

 
Victor and Cheek
in "Kalila wa Dimna," a Translation of Panchatantra
Source: Manuscript Dated circa 1200 AD, Syria

           
         

 
   

"While in men of learning and native dignity, an inner weakness is not detected even with the lapse of time. It remains hidden, unless of their own accord they cast dignity aside and display what is vulnerable in their minds. For

Did not the silly peacock wheel
In giddy dance at thunder's peal,
What peering effort could reveal
His nakedness?
 

 

           
         

 
   

"Since, then, you are a villain, good advice is thrown away upon you. As the saying goes:

No knife prevails against a stone;
Nor bends the unbending tree;
No good advice from Needle-Face
Helped indocility."

"How was that?" asked Victor. And Cheek told the story of

THE UNTEACHABLE MONKEY  

 

           
         

 
   

 

 

           
         

 
   

Questions (From Text)

1. Name the main characters in this story.

2. Which proverb in this story do you find most interesting or relevant? Please write it down.

3. What learning does Vishnusharma want to teach thru this story? (100 words)

[Hint: A verse at end of previous story, repeated at end of this story, captures it.]

 
 


           
         

 
   

Projects (Internet / Library)

1. Blossom wanted to live forever but could not even though the Gods themselves wanted him to live forever. What is the maximum life span in parrots, elephants, horses, dogs, cats? [Hint: Visit Link-1 , Link-2 .]

2. What is the maximum life span of human beings? [Hint: Visit Link-1 .]

3. What is the average  life spans of human beings? - Find the same for top three countries, Sri Lanka, India, World average, Pakistan, & bottom three countries. [Hint: Visit Link-1 .]

4. What is the average life expectancy of males versus females in India? What are the World Averages for men and women? Do women live longer than men on an average? [Hint: Visit Link-1 .]

5. Ancient Hindu tradition considers 100 years as the life span of a human being and divides it into four 'asharamas' or four stages. Name these four and write 2 to 4 sentences on each. [Hint: Visit some of these: Link-1 , Link-2 , Link-3 , Link-4 , Link-5 .]

 
 


           
         

 
   

Activities (Home / School)

1. Paint and/or illustrate the most interesting proverb. Display on school notice-board.

2. Read the story aloud to others.

3. Read the story and then re-tell it. Don't memorize. Re-telling won't be perfect which is okay!

(i) Re-tell in your own words to others.
(ii) Re-tell in your mother tongue to a younger brother or sister.

4. Role Play the story in your class. Reading from text has to be perfect. Click here for more Guidelines.

5. Enact this story as a drama or as a dance-drama.

 
 
Panchatantra Enacted by Angahara Ensemble in USA
Credit: Angahara, http://picasaweb.google.com

           
         

 
   

Let Us Get Togther

Please contribute to further improvement & enhancing utilization of this website. Email your suggestions & comments to alka@hrera.com .

 
 


           
         

 
   

 

 

           
         

 
   

Questions (From Text)

1. Name the main characters in this story.

2. Which proverb in this story do you find most interesting or relevant? Please write it down.

3. What learning does Vishnusharma want to teach thru this story? (100 words)

[Hint: A verse at end of previous story, repeated at end of this story, captures it.]

 
 


           
         

 
   

 

 


           
         

 
   

Activities (Home / School)

1. Paint and/or illustrate the most interesting proverb. Display on school notice-board.

2. Read the story aloud to others.

3. Read the story and then re-tell it. Don't memorize. Re-telling won't be perfect which is okay!

(i) Re-tell in your own words to others.
(ii) Re-tell in your mother tongue to a younger brother or sister.

3. Was it correct for the father to give his daughter in marriage without even enquiring anything about the bridegroom? - Discuss in class (15 minutes) Answer

4. Can today's youngsters marry a person without meeting him/her? - Discuss (15 minutes)

5. This story tells about a girl committed to making her proposed marriage work by living with her husband irrespective of his husbandly qualities (rather the obvious lack of them). So the burden, if we may say so, rested on the girl or woman, to make the marriage last. In modern society this commitment is far weaker which is one of the reasons pushing up divorce rates. Divide the following questions amongst class fellows & then present your answers in class (60 minutes):

(i) Name the three countries in world in which law does not permit a divorce (as of 2008). [Hint: Visit Link-1 .]

(ii) In India, followers of each religion have their own law governing marriage & divorce. Name the Indian laws applicable to followers of different religions in India. [Hint: Visit Link-1 .]

(iii) By and large, there are five grounds which are generally accepted by courts in India for granting a divorce. Describe each in three sentences at the most. (200 words). [Hint: Visit Link-1 or Link-2 .]

(iv) Divorce has many implications. Write three to five sentences on each of the following implications - Emotional; Financial; Medical & Psychological. [Hint: Visit Link-1 .] 

6. Professor D. L. Ashliman has listed 12 folktales from across the globe which are similar to this story.  Write in your own words / Re-tell the following story. At the end give details of foreign story-book from which it is taken:

The Girl and the Snake (Sweden)

[Hint: Go to Link-1 .]

7. Role Play the story in your class. Reading from text has to be perfect. Click here for more Guidelines.

8. Enact this story as a drama or as a dance-drama.

 
 


           
         

 
   

Let Us Get Togther

Please contribute to further improvement & enhancing utilization of this website. Email your suggestions & comments to alka@hrera.com .

 
 


           
         

 
   

 

 

           
         

 
   

Questions (From Text)

1. Name the main characters in this story.

2. Which proverb in this story do you find most interesting or relevant? Please write it down.

3. What learning does Vishnusharma want to teach thru this story? (100 words)

[Hint: A verse at end of previous story, repeated at end of this story, captures it.]

 
 


           
         

 
   

Projects (Internet / Library)

1. King told Counselor Strong that the naked monk left his present body, visited heaven, and returned with another heavenly body.  The counselor, presumably thought this to be impossible & untrue. He tested it burning the present body of the naked monk.

What is 'scientific method'? What are the four steps in it? [Hint: Visit Link-1 .]

 
 


           
         

 
   

Activities (Home / School)

1. Paint and/or illustrate the most interesting proverb. Display on school notice-board.

2. Read the story aloud to others.

3. Read the story and then re-tell it. Don't memorize. Re-telling won't be perfect which is okay!

(i) Re-tell in your own words to others.
(ii) Re-tell in your mother tongue to a younger brother or sister.

4. Are astrology, palmistry, numerology true sciences in modern sense of the term? Or are they only theories to bluff people? Do you believe in them? Do others known to you believe in them & follow while starting a new work or fixing a marriage date? - Discuss (30 minutes)

5. Depict the 'scientific method' in a chart and put it on the school notice board. [Hint: Sample charts are at Link-1 , Link-2 . You can make better ones.]

6. Role Play the story in your class. Reading from text has to be perfect. Click here for more Guidelines.

7. Enact this story as a drama or as a dance-drama.

 
 
Panchatantra Enacted, Aditi School, Bangalore
Credit: http://picasaweb.google.com/susan40

           
         

 
   

Let Us Get Togther

Please contribute to further improvement & enhancing utilization of this website. Email your suggestions & comments to alka@hrera.com .

 
 


           
           

       
   


Time Sink
Astrovine, Flickr

 

           
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Panchatantra
   
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